The Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation is a force of healing and hope for individuals, families and communities affected by addiction to alcohol and other drugs. As the nation's leading nonprofit provider of comprehensive inpatient and outpatient treatment for adults and youth, the Foundation has 17 locations nationwide and collaborates with an expansive network throughout health care. With a legacy that began in 1949 and includes the 1982 founding of the Betty Ford Center, the Foundation today also encompasses a graduate school of addiction studies, a publishing division, an addiction research center, recovery advocacy and thought leadership, professional and medical education programs, school-based prevention resources and a specialized program for children who grow up in families with addiction.
Methamphetamine, or meth, is a chemical stimulant with effects that are similar to cocaine. Like cocaine, meth speeds up all of the body’s vital activities, including heart rate, breathing, and metabolism. But the rush of a meth high can last longer than the high of cocaine — up to half an hour, compared with several minutes for crack. Meth is sold as a white or crystalline powder that can be snorted, smoked, or injected. Powerfully addictive, meth can quickly lead the user into dependence and addiction. Meth users have been known to go on extended binges, using the drug for days or even weeks without stopping to sleep or eat.
Get treatment for other medical or mental health issues. People often abuse alcohol to ease the symptoms of an undiagnosed mental health problem, such as depression or anxiety. As you seek help for alcohol addiction, it’s also important to get treatment for any other psychological issues you’re experiencing. Your best chance of recovery is by getting combined mental health and addiction treatment from the same treatment provider or team.

The physician should have AA literature in the office (dates and places of meetings), have the AA phone number available, and know about other treatment services in the community, including referrals for medical consultants or specialists in chemical dependency. No randomized trials of AA have been performed, but a US Veterans Administration study suggested that patients who attended meetings did much better than those who refused to go.


Repeat on each part of your body that’s experiencing the craving. What changes occur in the sensations? Notice how the urge comes and goes. You’ll likely notice that after a few minutes the craving has gone. The purpose of urge surfing is not to make cravings disappear, but to experience them in a new way. However, with practice, you’ll learn how to ride your cravings out until they go away naturally.
Withdrawal. Medications and devices can help suppress withdrawal symptoms during detoxification. Detoxification is not in itself "treatment," but only the first step in the process. Patients who do not receive any further treatment after detoxification usually resume their drug use. One study of treatment facilities found that medications were used in almost 80 percent of detoxifications (SAMHSA, 2014). In November 2017, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted a new indication to an electronic stimulation device, NSS-2 Bridge, for use in helping reduce opioid withdrawal symptoms. This device is placed behind the ear and sends electrical pulses to stimulate certain brain nerves. Also, in May 2018, the FDA approved lofexidine, a non-opioid medicine designed to reduce opioid withdrawal symptoms.
Ask for friends and family to support you in the recovery process; chances are, they’ll be proud of you for taking control of your life again. External support groups include Alcoholics Anonymous (AA), which originated the 12-step program and now has approximately 2 million members. The 12 steps emphasize the participant’s ability to submit to a “higher power” to ask for help. The higher power doesn’t have to be rooted in religion, though that is the case for many. Others look for a “higher power” within.
Some drug abuse facts and statistics show a significant and steady increase in American opioid use, contributing to the nation’s growing opioid crisis. The CDC reports a 29.7 percent increase in opioid-overdose emergency room visits from July 2016 to September 2017. Wisconsin and Delaware saw the largest rise in overdose emergency room visits, with an increase of 109 and 105 percent respectively.

The path to drug addiction begins with the voluntary act of taking drugs. But over time, a person's ability to choose not to do so becomes compromised. Seeking and taking the drug becomes compulsive. This is mostly due to the effects of long-term drug exposure on brain function. Addiction affects parts of the brain involved in reward and motivation, learning and memory, and control over behavior.
The specific medicines prescribed will vary depending upon your own particular experience of withdrawal and the symptoms you are manifesting, and it may be that certain medications will not be appropriate depending on your substance of abuse or your own personal health history; an experienced medical professional will be able to make those decisions to ensure you go through withdrawal as safely as possible.
According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, addiction is a "chronic, relapsing brain disease that is characterized by compulsive drug seeking and use, despite harmful consequences."7  There is no simple cure for addiction; however, effective treatment can help you become and stay sober.7  You will have to manage your addiction throughout your life, the same way a diabetic has to manage their condition with ongoing efforts like a proper diet and exercise.8
The most important thing to consider after alcohol rehabilitation is having an aftercare program that allows you continued treatment and a safe environment to maintain sobriety. It is also important that you follow suggestions to help you continue to maintain constant sobriety. Suggestions can include attendance at Alcoholics Anonymous, SMART recovery or another community or church groups, addiction counseling, or living in a halfway house. Finding a safe environment to live in while entering back in to the normal realm of every day life is imperative.
It is well known that our body and appearance change the older we get, but most do not realise that the way in which alcohol is broken down and processed slows with age. According to the Royal College of Psychiatrists, the recommended alcohol guideline amounts of fourteen units per week should probably be lower for older adults to take account of these changes.

Michael’s House is a residential drug rehabilitation facility located in Southern California. We are a high-end treatment center that helps patients overcome their dependence on drugs and alcohol. Our “whole body” approach to recovery is designed to promote health and wellness on every level. We know how you feel and are ready to help. If you have any questions, please feel free to call right now. If you have insurance, please get your information ready, and we can tell you what forms of treatment are covered. Please take this important step in your recovery today. Megan's Battle With Alcohol Addiction | True Stories of Addiction | Detox to Rehab
In-House Treatment Centers provide drug and alcohol rehab for individuals and their families that are suffering from moderate to severe addiction to alcohol, substance abuse, and co-occurring disorders.  As differentiated from Hospital Drug and Alcohol Rehab Programs, In-House Treatment Centers are often located in resort-style, private facilities designed to treat the whole person with a more personalized and compassionate approach to recovery. Psychology of Drug Addiction & Substance Abuse Disorder, Causes & Solutions
Get treatment for other medical or mental health issues. People often abuse alcohol to ease the symptoms of an undiagnosed mental health problem, such as depression or anxiety. As you seek help for alcohol addiction, it’s also important to get treatment for any other psychological issues you’re experiencing. Your best chance of recovery is by getting combined mental health and addiction treatment from the same treatment provider or team.
Determine the patient's readiness for change. Motivating a reluctant patient is one of the great challenges in treatment. To enhance the prospects of successful treatment, the clinician needs to have a basic concept of the stages of change. The 5 stages of change (Prochaska,) provide fundamental guidance for enhancing motivation. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment presents this concept in detail through a Treatment Improvement Protocol titled "Enhancing Motivation for Change in Substance Abuse Treatment." The 5 stages of change are precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, and maintenance. Specific strategies aligned with each of the 5 stages help a clinician motivate and prepare the patient for change. The 5 stages of change represent a cycle, permitting and explaining behavior that moves in both progressive and regressive directions.

Integrated alcohol treatment programs are designed for patients who meet the criteria for a substance use disorder and a form of mental illness. In a national study of co-occurring disorders, the Journal of the American Medical Association found that 37 percent of individuals with alcohol dependence also suffered from a mental health disorder, while over 50 percent of individuals who abused drugs also had a psychiatric illness. These patients face unique obstacles in recovery, such as low motivation, anxiety about new situations, poor concentration and delusional thinking. Integrated treatment, which targets both the patient’s mental illness and substance use disorder within the same program, is the most effective way to achieve a full recovery. Services for both issues are provided at a single facility, and delivered by staff members who are cross-trained in substance abuse treatment and mental health.
Disclaimer: Inclusion or omission of an organization or agency in this database does not imply endorsement or non-endorsement by canadadrugrehab.ca. In no event shall canadadrugrehab.ca be liable for any decision or action taken in reliance on information provided by this referral service. Any questions regarding an alcohol and drug rehab program listing should be directed to that organization. If you believe you need immediate assistance, call 911 or your local crisis line.
The specific medicines prescribed will vary depending upon your own particular experience of withdrawal and the symptoms you are manifesting, and it may be that certain medications will not be appropriate depending on your substance of abuse or your own personal health history; an experienced medical professional will be able to make those decisions to ensure you go through withdrawal as safely as possible. What happens in rehab?
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