Alcohol rehabilitation is the process of combining medical and psychotherapeutic treatments to address dependency on alcohol. The goal of both, drug and alcohol rehabilitation (inpatient or outpatient) is for the patient to remain permanently abstinent and gain the psychological tools for long-term sobriety. Who should attend rehab treatment? Anyone who’s life, health, work or relationships are affected by chronic alcohol or drugs use. The intent of rehabilitation is to enable a patient to be successful in life and avoid the drastic consequences that alcohol abuse can cause.
The different types of rehab facilities fall into two categories or “settings.” The two settings are inpatient (full-time rehab) and outpatient (part-time rehab). Inpatient means the client lives at the facility, and each step of the rehab process is typically completed there. Patients who attend an outpatient facility return home after treatment each day and often complete the steps of rehab at different facilities. Below is a comparison of the most common program options within those two rehab settings.
When you or someone close to you needs drug abuse rehab, it can be hard to know where exactly to find help. Without the proper help, however, substance abuse can lead to potential life-threatening situations. Additionally, drug abuse affects not only the life of the individual user but also the lives of his or her family. Fortunately, there are a variety of effective treatment methods to help individuals overcome their drug addictions.
Gateway Foundation is a national provider that has 17 convenient drug treatment centers in Illinois, Delaware and California to serve our patients in the places and communities they call home. We put our patients at the center of their substance abuse treatment—life-saving treatment that stays with them throughout their lives. Through individualized treatment, we’re able to help them discover what will work best for them in their journey to overcome drug and alcohol addiction. Brene Brown Knows! Toxic Shame & Trauma in Addiction Treatment w/ Gerald Loren Fishkin
Treatments at inpatient centers may include behavioral therapies, the most popular of which is Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). These therapies encourage participants to change the way they react to stressful external stimuli (like failing a test or losing a job) by promoting healthy ways of coping. Many centers also offer group and individual counseling, experiential therapies and training on proper nutrition and health. Luxury Executive Rehab For Drugs and Alcohol:Rehab Near Me
An additional cognitively-based model of substance abuse recovery has been offered by Aaron Beck, the father of cognitive therapy and championed in his 1993 book Cognitive Therapy of Substance Abuse.[42] This therapy rests upon the assumption addicted individuals possess core beliefs, often not accessible to immediate consciousness (unless the patient is also depressed). These core beliefs, such as "I am undesirable," activate a system of addictive beliefs that result in imagined anticipatory benefits of substance use and, consequentially, craving. Once craving has been activated, permissive beliefs ("I can handle getting high just this one more time") are facilitated. Once a permissive set of beliefs have been activated, then the individual will activate drug-seeking and drug-ingesting behaviors. The cognitive therapist's job is to uncover this underlying system of beliefs, analyze it with the patient, and thereby demonstrate its dysfunctional. As with any cognitive-behavioral therapy, homework assignments and behavioral exercises serve to solidify what is learned and discussed during treatment.[43]
The first step in addiction recovery is detox. The physical symptoms and withdrawal period varies depending on the drug abused, the length and the severity of drug addiction. Detoxing is not only about ridding the body of these “toxins” but also re-setting the neuro-chemistry of the brain that has been altered due to drug abuse. At Searidge Drug Rehab and Detox Centre, we work closely with our team of addiction treatment professionals to provide you with compassionate care by customising a detox program that works best for you.
Nalmefene, an opiate antagonist that is similar in its chemical structure to naltrexone, is one of the most recent drugs being investigated for the treatment of alcoholism. Like naltrexone (sold as ReVia, Depade, or Vivitrol), nalmefene deprives the person struggling with substance use of the pleasurable feelings associated with drinking. But nalmefene is less toxic to the liver than naltrexone. As of 2013, nalmefene was still undergoing clinical trials through the U.S. National Institutes of Health before receiving FDA approval. From Rehab to a Body Bag | Dying for Treatment: VICE Reports (Full Length)
×