Once you complete the rehabilitation stage, you will begin to gradually acclimate yourself to daily life. It’s important to give yourself time to ease back into the swing of things. Attending support groups, such as Alcoholics Anonymous or Al-Anon, that offer encouragement and engagement with others in recovery, group leaders and sponsors can be a positive way to make a lifestyle change and maintain sobriety.
Different rehabs are based upon different philosophies, and this can mean the enhancement of addiction treatment with distinct specialized services. For example, a religious rehab may include worship services or religion classes and other offerings that enhance the spiritual side of recovery while a holistic alcohol rehab may include yoga, meditation, acupuncture and other alternative methods of treatment.
Inpatient residential rehab involves an extended time period for treatment, regardless of the substance. Programs typically last 30–45 days, or longer, depending on each client’s needs. Clients are required to stay at the facility for the entirety of the program, including overnight. Although there is no single treatment that’s right for everyone, inpatient rehab is one of the most effective forms of care for drug and alcohol addiction.
Many chronic conditions such as arthritis or diabetes carry a risk of recurrence, even after years of successful medical management. In a similar way, there will always be a possibility of relapse for those in recovery.1 However, finding a reputable treatment program that utilizes evidence-based treatment (and staying in treatment long enough—NIDA recommends at least 3 months) gives people a head start on sobriety and gives them the tools they'll need to prevent relapse.2 Drug Rehab Near Me
Almost all alcoholics who have been chronic, heavy drinkers will experience some level of withdrawal symptoms when they suddenly stop drinking. These symptoms can range from mild shakes and discomfort to life-threatening delirium tremens -- which can include confusion, hallucinations, convulsions, autonomic instability, and death. Long-time, heavy drinkers who decide to quit drinking should seek medical assistance first.
Many patients get caught up in trying to define their relationship with drugs and alcohol. For example, drug abuse, has a far less threatening reputation than that of drug addiction. According to Medline Plus, an issue with drug abuse is defined as the regular abuse of any illicit substance including alcohol over the course of a year with negative consequences. These negative consequences can be financial, interpersonal, work-related, legal, health-related – anything that changes the patient’s experience of day-to-day life for the worse.2
As with other diseases and disorders, the likelihood of developing an addiction differs from person to person, and no single factor determines whether a person will become addicted to drugs. In general, the more risk factors a person has, the greater the chance that taking drugs will lead to drug use and addiction. Protective factors, on the other hand, reduce a person's risk. Risk and protective factors may be either environmental or biological.
While these 10 treatment centers are among some of the best in the nation, there are countless credible treatment centers out there. Every treatment center has different services and qualities to fit your needs. Whether those needs are based on location, price, experience or the programs offered by the facility, there is a treatment center out there for you. Find a treatment center today.
Sober living homes are best suited to those seeking transitional housing as they recover from a substance use disorder. Cost-effective, safe, sober and healthy environments provide a place to build strength in a recovery community and establish addiction recovery support groups. Outpatient Treatment is also provided at all Gateway Foundation Recovery Homes, so when it’s time to move forward, the skills and support network remain.
Nalmefene, an opiate antagonist that is similar in its chemical structure to naltrexone, is one of the most recent drugs being investigated for the treatment of alcoholism. Like naltrexone (sold as ReVia, Depade, or Vivitrol), nalmefene deprives the person struggling with substance use of the pleasurable feelings associated with drinking. But nalmefene is less toxic to the liver than naltrexone. As of 2013, nalmefene was still undergoing clinical trials through the U.S. National Institutes of Health before receiving FDA approval. From Rehab to a Body Bag | Dying for Treatment: VICE Reports (Full Length)
×