An influential cognitive-behavioral approach to addiction recovery and therapy has been Alan Marlatt's (1985) Relapse Prevention approach.[40] Marlatt describes four psycho-social processes relevant to the addiction and relapse processes: self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, attributions of causality, and decision-making processes. Self-efficacy refers to one's ability to deal competently and effectively with high-risk, relapse-provoking situations. Outcome expectancy refer to an individual's expectations about the psychoactive effects of an addictive substance. Attributions of causality refer to an individual's pattern of beliefs that relapse to drug use is a result of internal, or rather external, transient causes (e.g., allowing oneself to make exceptions when faced with what are judged to be unusual circumstances). Finally, decision-making processes are implicated in the relapse process as well. Substance use is the result of multiple decisions whose collective effects result in a consumption of the intoxicant. Furthermore, Marlatt stresses some decisions—referred to as apparently irrelevant decisions—may seem inconsequential to relapse, but may actually have downstream implications that place the user in a high-risk situation.[41]
Drug abuse takes a financial toll on all Americans. The use of illicit drugs such as heroin, cocaine, meth and ecstasy costs the U.S. $11 billion in health care. According to the U.S. Department of Justice, total yearly costs in terms of hospitalization, emergency medical care, lost work productivity, premature death and criminal behavior surpassed $193 billion in 2007.
Outpatient drug rehab programs are also available, and they can vary in terms of intensity as well as length.5 Some outpatient programs may last from several hours per day to just a few times per week. Outpatient care typically allows patients to remain at home while receiving necessary treatment. This can be beneficial for individuals who are attending school or need to maintain a regular work schedule.6 The disadvantage to nonresidential care is that individuals may typically still face daily struggles that can trigger drug abuse.7
The National Institute of Mental Health defines depression as a common but serious mood disorder that causes severe symptoms that can affect how you feel, think and handle daily activities. These symptoms must be present for at least two weeks in order for an individual to be diagnosed with depression. In many cases, depression and substance abuse occur simultaneously. Sometimes depression precedes substance abuse, and other times, the reverse is true. In addition to facilities that treat substance use and co-occurring disorders, there are various inpatient facilities for mental health alone. As an inpatient for depression, you can receive individualized care at The Recovery Village.
To find a rehab center near you, you can start your search with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Use their Directory of Single State Agencies for Substance Abuse Services to find the local resource to contact in your state. Be prepared to verify your income, whether you have any insurance, and any need for financial support before you can enroll.
The first step in addiction recovery is detox. The physical symptoms and withdrawal period varies depending on the drug abused, the length and the severity of drug addiction. Detoxing is not only about ridding the body of these “toxins” but also re-setting the neuro-chemistry of the brain that has been altered due to drug abuse. At Searidge Drug Rehab and Detox Centre, we work closely with our team of addiction treatment professionals to provide you with compassionate care by customising a detox program that works best for you.
During the early stages of alcohol recovery, patients can be confused and scared. Their emotions can run high to the point that what they are thinking and feeling interferes with recovery. Meditation addresses these sorts of things. By helping patients relax and focus their thoughts inward, meditation eases patient fears and clears up confusion. Patients are more apt to benefit from treatment in this more relaxed state.
For many people struggling with addiction, the toughest step toward recovery is the very first one: recognizing that you have a problem and deciding to make a change. It’s normal to feel uncertain about whether you’re ready to make a change, or if you have what it takes to quit. If you’re addicted to a prescription drug, you may be concerned about how you’re going to find an alternate way to treat a medical condition. It’s okay to feel torn. Committing to sobriety involves changing many things, including:
Inpatient addiction treatment focuses on stabilization and assessment of your health to ensure you are ready--physically, psychologically and emotionally--to learn about core recovery concepts and to begin practicing recovery principles. Each day, you will be given a schedule of treatment activities, appointments and services tailored to meet your specific recovery needs and goals. Learn more about what happens in a typical day of inpatient addiction treatment. Robin Williams: Alcohol, Cocaine, & Rehab
Substance abuse therapy: Used as a part of many inpatient and outpatient programs, therapy is one of the cornerstones of drug addiction treatment. Individual, group and family therapy help patients and their loved ones understand the nature and causes of addiction. Therapy teaches coping strategies and life skills needed to live a productive, sober life in the community. For individuals with a co-occurring mental illness, intensive psychotherapy can also address psychiatric symptoms and find the underlying issues that contribute to addiction. Inside Shalom House, Australia’s ‘strictest’ drug rehabilitation | Australian Story
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